Issues

Love & Femininity
StAR July August 2020_COVER

Love & Femininity

July/August Issue – Love & Femininity

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July/August Table of Contents

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Toxic Masculinity or a New Paradigm for Healthy Relationships? – Cristina Pineda

At first glance, Northanger Abbey (1817) might seem to repeat the trope of sexist man mentoring his wide-eyed future bride, but upon analysis, Henry Tilney and Catherine Morland’s relationship proves more egalitarian. Fast forward two hundred years to the twenty-first century where morals and manners have blurred lines, and Jane Austen’s wisdom into the nature of healthy relationships deserves close attention.

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Saint John Paul II: A Centenary Celebration
StAR May June 2020_COVER

Saint John Paul II: A Centenary Celebration

May/June Issue – Saint John Paul II: A Centenary Celebration

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May/June Table of Contents

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St. John Paul II Teaches the Unbelievers: A Newly Discovered Manuscript – Jaymie Stuart Wolfe

 Uncertain of whether jetlag or excitement had me up and out of bed, I did something I hardly ever do and checked my email at 3:00 AM. There it was: an email from the Vatican publishing house. I opened the pdf of the manuscript I had requested and began scrolling, but stopped when a photographic image of a handwritten page filled the screen. In that very dark California hotel room, with my hand suspended over the screen, I experienced the presence of St. John Paul II in a way I cannot explain.

I do not read Polish, so I quickly copied and pasted the table of contents into an online translator and then, bit by bit, the first few pages. The translation, of course, was rough, but with a bit of smoothing, I could hear his voice. It was unmistakable. Tears welled up when I realized that I was perhaps the very first person to read these words in English. 

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American Literature in the Twentieth Century
StAR March April 2020_COVER

American Literature in the Twentieth Century

March/April – American Literature in the Twentieth Century

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March/April Table of Contents

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John Allen Wyeth – by Dana Gioia

 The remarkable poetry of John Allan Wyeth nearly vanished for a simple reason. The author published only one book, This Man’s Army (1928), and then abandoned the practice of poetry. The book received excellent reviews and sold well enough to be reprinted in 1929 just as the Depression brought the great decade of American Modernism to an end. Wyeth headed to Europe where he studied painting. He enjoyed some success as an artist. He even composed music, but he never published another poem.

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Beyond the Waste Land: The Vision of T.S. Eliot
StAR Jan Feb 2020_COVER

Beyond the Waste Land: The Vision of T.S. Eliot

January/February – Beyond the Waste Land: The Vision of T.S. Eliot

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January/February Table of Contents

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Ash-Wednesday – by Carl E. Olson

“Teach us to care and not to care Teach us to sit still.”
— Ash-Wednesday, I

I discovered the poetry of T. S. Eliot at the age of thirteen, a skinny kid in small town Montana who had, for some strange reason, a love of poetry, the novels of Dickens, the music of Mozart, and the art of Andrew Wyeth. All of these are an inter-mingled mystery, even in hindsight, and I suppose they really remain so, as the attraction of great literature and art is a mystery bound to The Mystery. I’m quite certain that my first Eliot poems were The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock and The Hollow Men—the former darkly exotic (“the yellow smoke that slides along the streets”) and the latter oddly apocalyptic (“This is the dead land”).

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Brideshead & Beyond: The Genius of Evelyn Waugh
StAR Nov Dec 2019_COVER

Brideshead & Beyond: The Genius of Evelyn Waugh

November/December – Brideshead & Beyond: The Genius of Evelyn Waugh

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November/December 2019 Table of Contents

Sample Article

Ash-Wednesday – by Carl E. Olson

“Teach us to care and not to care Teach us to sit still.”
— Ash-Wednesday, I

I discovered the poetry of T. S. Eliot at the age of thirteen, a skinny kid in small town Montana who had, for some strange reason, a love of poetry, the novels of Dickens, the music of Mozart, and the art of Andrew Wyeth. All of these are an inter-mingled mystery, even in hindsight, and I suppose they really remain so, as the attraction of great literature and art is a mystery bound to The Mystery. I’m quite certain that my first Eliot poems were The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock and The Hollow Men—the former darkly exotic (“the yellow smoke that slides along the streets”) and the latter oddly apocalyptic (“This is the dead land”).

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What is Wrong: Pride and the Fall of Modernity
StAR Sept Oct 2019_COVER

What is Wrong: Pride and the Fall of Modernity

September/October – What is Wrong: Pride and the Fall of Modernity

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September/October 2019 Table of Contents

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Turning a Blind Eye to the Murder and Rape of Christians – David Alton

In 1896, at the age of 87, former British Prime Minister William Gladstone made his last public speech. It was at Hengler’s Circus in Liverpool before an audience of 6,000 people. The meeting was called after news reached England of the massacre of more than 2,000 Armenians in Constantinople in addition to many more massacres throughout the Turkish Empire. Gladstone described these atrocities as the “most monstrous series of proceedings that has ever been recorded in the dismal and the deplorable history of human crime…a disgrace to the civilisation of the nineteenth century”. He said that to these atrocities were added the work of “lust, torture, pillage, starvation” and “every wickedness that men could devise”—all seen “under the eyes of foreign ambassadors”.

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Man Alive! The Wonder of G.K. Chesterton
StAR July August 2019 _COVER

Man Alive! The Wonder of G.K. Chesterton

July/August 2019 – Man Alive! The Wonder of G.K. Chesterton

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July/August 2019 Table of Contents

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Burke vs Chesterton: Mistaking a Friend for an Enemy – Brett Fawcett

A Canadian Catholic who believes in the virtue of patriotism faces a similar problem to that of G. K. Chesterton, during the period in which he deliberated becoming Catholic. Chesterton’s dilemma was whether he simultaneously could be a patriotic Englishman and a Catholic, given how closely tied British identity was to the Anglican Church. Yet Chesterton makes such a compelling case for the virtue of patriotism based on the need for a person to have something of his own to love. This is the animating spirit of his defense of widely distributing private property; it is what drove his case for a Jewish homeland; and it is the reason he stood opposed to British colonialism: both the colonizers and the colonized already had their own nations of which they could be proud.

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The Witness & Wisdom of C.S. Lewis
StAR May June 2019_Cover

The Witness & Wisdom of C.S. Lewis

May/June 2019 – The Witness & Wisdom of C.S. Lewis

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May/June 2019 Table of Contents

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The American Inkling: Clyde S. Kilby and the Well of Wonder

A Well of Wonder is, indeed, a source of wonder; the sacred and satisfying kind of wonder. It is a collection of wonder-inducing essays by Clyde S. Kilby (1902–1986), one of the earliest American academics to study and introduce to students the works of C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, and others who made up the remarkable group known as the Oxford Inklings. It is no stretch to say that Kilby, a long time Professor of English at Wheaton College, Illinois, did more than any other man to incorporate the ideas and imaginative visions of Lewis, Tolkien, Owen Barfield, George MacDonald, Dorothy Sayers, G. K. Chesterton, and Charles Williams into the evangelical Christian landscape, thereby building solid bridges between many diverse denominations and sects of Christianity in America.

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Faith & Fairy Stories
StAR March April 2019_COVER

Faith & Fairy Stories

March/April 2019 – Faith & Fairy Stories

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March/April 2019 Table of Contents

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Faith, Fact, and Fairy Tale – William Randall Lancaster

If a paradox is a seeming self-contradiction that is actually true, what, then, might we call a seeming truth that is really a self-contradiction? What might we call a mysterious miracle of a man who rejects the very mystery and miracle of his own being, only to conclude unkindly that all of humankind are simply highly evolved, self-conscious molecular configurations which are no more than advanced, arbitrary animals rather than aspiring spirits moving a little lower than the angels; that all things tangible and intangible—including his very reasoning—are the resulting culmination of a continual, colossal, cosmic accident; and that all talk of religion and faith is just a fairy tale?

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Ernest Hemingway & Graham Greene: Prodigal Sons of the Church
StAR Jan Feb 2019_Cover

Ernest Hemingway & Graham Greene: Prodigal Sons of the Church

January/February 2019 – Ernest Hemingway & Graham Greene: Prodigal Sons of the Church

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January/February 2019 Table of Contents

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Hemingway’s Catholic Heart –  Mary Claire Kendall

“Born as the Victorian era was breathing its last, Ernest Hemingway initially only knew the Protestant world of Oak Park where he grew up, not far from Chicago.

Later, while serving with the American Red Cross Ambulance Corps in Italy in the summer of 1918, the budding writer discovered the richness of Catholicism—with all five senses. He bathed in Mary’s love and soaked up the redemptive reality of her son Jesus hanging on that wooden cross, writhing in pain, to his very sinews, the great European cathedrals he visited punctuating this reality. He was just seventeen. The experience was transformative.”

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