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The St. Austin Review (StAR) is the premier international journal of Catholic culture, literature, and ideas. In its pages, printed every two months, some of the brightest and most vigorous minds around meet to explore the people, ideas, movements, and events that shape and misshape our world.


From the Ink Desk Blog


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Faith and Folklore

An interview I gave to Bernie Anderson of folkloristic.com has just been uploaded. The overall topic is faith and folklore but we covered a multitude of topics including Chesterton, Lewis, Tolkien, Wilde and the Great Books. It can be heard on this link: http://www.folkloristic.com/podcast/2016/12/4/episode-6-a-conversation-with-joseph-pearce
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Home to Tea and Toast

One of the most accessible Christian poets in English would have been 110 this year.  John Betjeman (1906-1984), whose journalism and poetry conveyed the sooty red brick atmosphere of mid-twentieth century Britain, was late in his life honored with a knighthood and the title of Poet Laureate.  Born into a prosperous manufacturing family in the north of London, he went to Oxford, where his frivolous approach to his studies exasperated his tutor, C. S. Lewis,…
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Sacred Music for My Desert Island

Inspired by the words of Lorenzo in The Merchant of Venice and longing for the powers of Prospero in The Tempest I wax longingly for a desert island of desire in which I could surround myself with my favourite sacred music. Such was the flight of my Muse in my latest piece for the Imaginative Conservative: http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/2016/11/mark-music-sounds-celestial-desert-island-joseph-pearce.html
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To Be a Pilgrim: Thanksgiving as a Pilgrimage

Thanksgiving, for most people here in America, is something of a precursor of Christmas that initiates a deluge of holiday hits playing ad nauseum in public and private locales until sugar plum fairies dance in your worst nightmares. It is a day when family and friends gather together across a table laden with various delicacies erroneously claimed to be eaten by Pilgrims and Indians, trying their best to avoid ever-controversial politics and religion topics that…
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An Idiot’s Guide to Shakespeare

So much nonsense is written and believed about Shakespeare that my latest article for Intellectual Takeout provides an “Idiot’s Guide” to the Bard and his work. http://www.intellectualtakeout.org/blog/was-shakespeare-really-nihilist
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The Everlasting Caesar

Is it dangerous to believe that the Presidential Election rendered a fatal blow to secularism? You better believe it! http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/2016/11/everlasting-caesar-post-secular-future-joseph-pearce.html
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The Poet and the Saint

Spanish speakers might be interested in this beautiful presentation of an article I wrote on the poet Roy Campbell’s heroic protection of the manuscripts of St. John of the Cross from the hands of communists during the Spanish Civil War: http://www.religionenlibertad.com/toledo-1936-cuando-roy-campbell-jugo-vida-por-salvar-53080.htm
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Is it good to Build Walls?

Well, is it? Donald Trump thinks it is. The pope seems to think it isn’t? Who’s right? Here’s my answer: http://www.intellectualtakeout.org/blog/building-walls-protection-not-immoral-or-unchristian
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G. K. Chesterton: Eighty Years On

My latest article for the Imaginative Conservative is a tribute to Chesterton, eighty years after his death: http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/2016/11/gk-chesterton-eighty-years-joseph-pearce.html
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Seeing the Lamp by the Light of the Tree

What does it mean to be “connected”? Do we need to disconnect in order to connect? Am I talking nonsense, or am I perhaps hinting at a Chestertonian paradox? All is revealed in my most recent article for Intellectual Takeout: http://www.intellectualtakeout.org/blog/seeing-lamp-light-tree