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The St. Austin Review (StAR) is the premier international journal of Catholic culture, literature, and ideas. In its pages, printed every two months, some of the brightest and most vigorous minds around meet to explore the people, ideas, movements, and events that shape and misshape our world.


From the Ink Desk Blog


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No Hell Below Us, Above Us Only Sky

It’s almost a commonplace that hell is never mentioned in most Catholic homilies anymore, nor is it even alluded to.  But it’s even more of a problem that heaven, while never mentioned by name (out of embarrassment, I think), is even more misunderstood than hell. As to the banishment of hell, you need look no further than today’s Mass readings, which feature Our Lord’s parable of the invited guests, many of whom ignore the invitation…
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The Controversial Genius of Richard Wagner

Subscribers to the St. Austin Review might have a sense of déjà vu when they read my latest article for the Imaginative Conservative. It was first published as an editorial in StAR: http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/2017/10/richard-wagner-nazis-christianity-joseph-pearce.html
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Cowardice at Assumption College

My latest article for the Journal of the Cardinal Newman Society examines the dangerous ramifications of a decision by the President of Assumption College to kow-tow to threats of extremist violence: https://journal.newmansociety.org/2017/10/timidity-assumption-college/
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A New Adventure Begins

I’m delighted to announce the launch of the new online Journal of the Cardinal Newman Society, of which I am honoured and privileged to be the editor. Learn more: https://journal.newmansociety.org/2017/10/adventures-begins/
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Faith & Physics: Fr. LeMaître and the Big Bang

Faith & Physics: Fr. LeMaître and the Big Bang The new issue of the St. Austin Review is winging its way to the printers. This issue’s theme is “Faith & Physics: Fr. LeMaître and the Big Bang”. Highlights: John Beaumont raises the curtain on the theme with an “Introduction to a Great Priest Cosmologist”. Julio A. Gonzalo looks at “LeMaître, Einstein and the Birth of Modern Cosmology”. Manuel Alfonseca compares “The Big Bang and Alternative Theories”, asking…
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Nationalism and Patriotism

Is there a difference between Nationalism and Patriotism? If there is, can we be one without being the other? I grapple with these questions in my latest article for the Imaginative Conservative: http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/2017/10/nationalism-patriotism-joseph-pearce.html
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Remembering the Russian Revolution: Romanticism versus Realism

  In an article for the Imaginative Conservative I lament the manner in which the butchery and bloodbath of the Russian Revolution is now being romanticized by those who put socialist political correctness before historical political reality: http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/2017/10/remembering-russian-revolution-triumph-romanticism-reality-joseph-pearce.html
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An Interview on Two of My Books

I was recently interviewed by Peter Socks, better known to many as the Catholic Book Blogger. The topics of conversation were two of my books, Frodo’s Journey and Heroes of the Catholic Reformation. You can hear the interview by following this link: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/catholicbookblogger/2017/10/09/off-shelf-041-joseph-pearce-heroes-catholic-reformation/
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Naming the Heresy

From an email to a friend … *** I keep searching for the name of the general attitude that unites liberal Catholics (including some bishops and cardinals) with the gender-bending secularists of our day.  I’m trying to find a better word than “Modernism”, which is too vague and has lost most of its punch.  The key mistaken belief of the liberalists / nihilists seems to be that we create meaning, we don’t discover it.  But…
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Systematically Exterminating the Disabled

In an article in the new issue of Legatus, I write about the systematic extermination of disabled children in Europe and the United States. Here’s the link to the online version: http://legatus.org/systematically-exterminating-the-disabled/
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Benjamin Franklin’s “The Morals of Chess”

“The Morals of Chess” By Benjamin Franklin. First published in “Columbian Magazine”, December 1786. Playing at Chess, is the most ancient and the most universal game known among men; for its original is beyond the memory of history, and it has, for numberless ages, been the amusement of all the civilized nations of Asia, the Persians, the Indians, and the Chinese. Europe has had it above 1000 years; the Spaniards have spread it over their…